Mobility

Mobility plan

There's no topic today as important and simultaneously undergoing such major changes than mobility. These current developments play a decisive role at the Siemens Campus Erlangen as well, as they're shaping the accessibility of the Campus by public transport, the parking opportunities for cars and bicycles – including charging stations for electric vehicles – as well as mobility on and throughout the Campus grounds. 

In order to fully consider all ongoing developments, the Siemens Campus Erlangen is continuously sharing information and ideas with a broad range of company-internal and outside actors and stakeholders. In addition, a "Mobility Day" held in 2019 was attended by some 100 participants including the Mayor of Erlangen, Florian Janik, and other representatives of the city of Erlangen, the urban transport planning commission, transport companies, the Campus project management and planning team and representatives from the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg as well as Siemens staffers and managers. 

The results produced by this conference, other analyses and studies are being incorporated into a comprehensive mobility plan. 

In a nutshell, these efforts aim to establish such excellent infrastructure for employees that they're motivated to switch to commuting by public transport or cycling. Over the medium term, new opportunities for bridging the last mile between train and bus stops and the employees' workplaces and new forms of mobility across the Campus itself will help us achieve the carbon neutrality that Siemens is striving for in terms of mobility, too. And in the long term, planners are already considering future digital networking of mobility opportunities – also for supply transport deliveries to and on the Campus. 

This will lend the Campus some strongly charismatic allure, spreading its reputation far beyond the immediate region. 

Mobility Day at the Siemens Campus Erlangen

The first Siemens Campus Erlangen Mobility Day was held May 27, 2019 inside and in front of the Heinrich-Lades-Halle in Erlangen, attended by invited representatives from all stakeholders. The purpose was to jointly develop, elaborate and collect ideas for a mobility plan with integrated mobility management for the Campus. They focused their efforts on four topic areas: Campus Mobility, Cargo & Visitors, Short-Distance Commuters (within a 10-km radius), and Long-Distance Commuters (outside a 10-km radius). Here are their key findings. 

Local public transport

The local public transport system plays an important role in interlinking the Campus with the city and points beyond. Company in-house studies revealed that good accessibility is decisive to winning over commuters to use public transport. Employees commuting from the nearby cities of Fürth and Nuremberg are already today choosing to take public transport much more frequently than their colleagues living the same distance away but in more rural regions with poorer public transport connections. 

The Siemens Campus is easy to reach by public transport, offering connections to the city of Erlangen's extensive bus line network as well as its own dedicated commuter rail S-Bahn stop Paul-Gossen-Strasse. 

Due to the sheer size of the overall Campus, however, the onward walking distances to some of the offices are not insignificant. This is why new mobility concepts are being explored not only for this final hop from public transport stops to the employees' offices, but also for "domestic travel" on the Campus. 

So-called mobility hubs are envisaged where employees can borrow bicycles, motor scooters, e-bikes or even cargo bikes for their own private use. Three hubs are to be established initially in Module 1 with an eye to gathering experience and, on the basis of these findings, later expanding the network around the entire Campus.  

Cyclists

Erlangen is a bicycle-friendly city with a culture of cycling. Siemens took this biking culture into account right from the start of planning for the Campus, with dedicated bicycle parking garages as integral components of mobility – and including charging stations for e-bikes. Just the Campus Module 1 alone offers almost 3,000 sheltered bicycle parking spaces and some 800 more outdoor parking spots – and of course showers, lockers and changing facilities for cyclists in all office buildings. 

Thanks to the extensive existing network of good bicycle paths in Erlangen, the Siemens Campus can be reached on bike from anywhere in the city within 15 minutes at maximum. Even many outlying residential areas and villages lie within a 30-minute bike-ride radius. What's more, two bike highways providing fast links to the east and west of the Campus are currently in the planning stage. 

When all is said and done, cycling benefits everyone. Cyclists generate no polluting emissions and don't need large parking lots. They're healthier, and on average they're off sick two days less per year. Cycling also increases an employee's motivation because – as scientifically proven – exercise "clears the head and frees your mind". 

Funded projects

The local public transport system plays an important role in interlinking the Campus with the city and points beyond. Company in-house studies revealed that good accessibility is decisive to winning over commuters to use public transport. Employees commuting from the nearby cities of Fürth and Nuremberg are already today choosing to take public transport much more frequently than their colleagues living the same distance away but in more rural regions with poorer public transport connections. 

The Siemens Campus is easy to reach by public transport, offering connections to the city of Erlangen's extensive bus line network as well as its own dedicated commuter rail S-Bahn stop Paul-Gossen-Strasse. 

Due to the sheer size of the overall Campus, however, the onward walking distances to some of the offices are not insignificant. This is why new mobility concepts are being explored not only for this final hop from public transport stops to the employees' offices, but also for "domestic travel" on the Campus. 

So-called mobility hubs are envisaged where employees can borrow bicycles, motor scooters, e-bikes or even cargo bikes for their own private use. Three hubs are to be established initially in Module 1 with an eye to gathering experience and, on the basis of these findings, later expanding the network around the entire Campus.