Siemens employees around the world plant trees

To make our world a little greener, Siemens employees in a number of countries are planting trees and taking care of them. Here’s the story of Milvia, Johanna and Sandip, just three out of 76,000 colleagues of Siemens Digital Industries worldwide.

“There’s nothing like fresh air and gardening,” says Milvia Carlini. “It was most enjoyable to simply be in nature. And seeing colleagues after many months of lockdowns – that was definitely another wonderful part.” Miliva Carlini is a Business Excellence and Finance Support professional, and among many other things, she helps to organize Siemens Canada's tree planting initiative for employees working out of Concord, Ontario. This team is responsible for Siemens Ruggedcom business – they manufacture rugged communications solutions for harsh environments.

 

“Tree planting is one of many wonderful events that help the environment and engage our colleagues in having fun,” Milvia Carlini explains. Siemens Canada employees in the program are committed to making a positive environmental impact. Every year hundreds of volunteers from across the country take time off work to plant trees in their local communities.

Since 2012, 2,100 Canadian employees have planted 14,599 trees. Combined, these trees would cover the equivalent area of 235 football fields and will sequester 43,800 tons of CO2 over the next 50 years – which is equivalent to diverting emissions from a car driving 4,000 times around the globe.

“It’s amazing to see your hard work growing,” Milvia Carlini comments when she visits the area where she and her colleagues planted trees in previous years. There’s no doubt that in the years ahead she’ll participate in tree planting again. At home she also considers the environment: “One of the first items we removed at home was single-use water bottles and food containers,” she says. “In our home we make sure to reuse an item for multi-purposes as much as we possibly can, and we fix broken items before repurchasing them. When it comes to water consumption, we limit the use of the dishwasher and are taking quicker showers.” And she adds, “There’s a lot more we’d like to do, but we’re taking little steps, which makes it easier to incorporate changes into our lifestyle.”

Tree-planting is also happening in other countries. In Erlangen, Germany, a team of employees led by Johanna Gebhardt is planting trees as part of a broader campaign in favor of the earth and to fight climate change. With help from a gardener, they pick trees that will be more likely to withstand higher temperatures in the future. “So far we’ve planted chestnut trees, a walnut tree, and a hawthorn,” Johanna Gebhardt says, and she adds, “The goal of planting and nurturing a tree is to bring the environment we all depend on into the consciousness of every employee. We hope it will go some way to influence peoples’ mindset – and ultimately their habits – to better protect the environment.”

In India, Sandip Talware organizes tree planting with friends. They formed the group Hirvaai, which in Marathi means “Greenery.” The group found barren land in Yeoor, a hilly area in Thane city of Maharashtra state, where they could plant trees. As of today, they’ve planted over 90 trees of Indian origin. What started as a group activity is now a ritual: They visit the location every Sunday to maintain the trees:  fencing the location and clearing weeds. The motivation of this group wasn’t just to make the area greener but also to provide food and safety for the animals and birds in that area. Sandip Talware believes that nature is the biggest motivator: “You give it little and it gives you a lot in return. That’s keeps me going.”

 

 

June 2021