This site uses cookies in order to improve your user experience and to provide content tailored specifically to your interests. Detailed information on the use of cookies on this website is provided in our Privacy Policy. You can also manage your preferences there.

By using this website, you consent to the use of cookies.

Learn more
OK

Desktop only

Desktop only

To use the writing tool please open Ingenuity on a desktop device

What are you writing about?

Need some help to get started? Read our writing tips.

What kind of article do you want to write?

Case study template

Use this template to write case studies and other long-form articles. Case studies present a challenge one of our customers faced and explains how we solved it. It consists of:

  • High-level summary
  • Background
  • Challenges
  • Findings
  • Reccomendations
  • Implementation

Use this template for: case studies, profile posts, future thinking, 'tools of the trade' or guest posts

List template

Show information in a concise, simple and structured way. Whether you’re writing "Top 10" articles or collecting content from across the web. Introduce your topic and let the readers explore it further themselves. This template consists of:

  • Introduction
  • List section

Use this template for: top 10, A-Z, checklists or similar list-based articles, curated lists of hyperlinks

Interview template

Present a personal conversation in a simple question-answer format. This template consists of:

  • Introduction
  • Questions
  • Answers

Use this template for: expert interviews, how-to guides.

Some writing tips

  • Choose a topic that truly fascinates you. Your enthusiasm will come through in your writing.

  • Write from your own point of view and use your own voice.

  • Challenge the status quo. In order to write about groundbreaking developments, you sometimes have to take a controversial stance.

  • Write in a clear, concise and comprehensible way. Write short sentences, use simple words and build a logical narrative.

  • Encourage discussion. Invite colleagues to contribute and readers to discuss your article.

  • Always check your grammar and make sure that your facts are correct before you hit “publish”.

Digital Twin
  • 0

Let’s start with, so what is a ‘digital twin’ – well, I would say that it is an exact representation of a component, or group of components, in a digital based environment i.e. a computer program. Not just a rough look-a-like, such as Minecraft or some other Xbox game (other gaming platforms are available), but a much more detailed and exact representation that includes fluid, mechanical and electrical simulation elements.

The digital twin isn’t only the component, it can be the final product that components assemble into, such as an airplane or car or other complex system… or it could even be a digital twin of the factory that is manufacturing those cars…  And Additive Manufacturing is a process that can take that digital model and in one manufacturing environment, layer by layer turn that digital model into physical reality.

As mentioned, in today’s businesses we already see digital twins being used to represent factories, cars, aircraft, computers, robots, etc. And in Additive Manufacturing we can only work in the digital world with a 3D digital model of the desired component.

What I find interesting now is that we can build the part, according to the 3D model, take that physical component and carry out our own 3D scan, creating yet another 3D model. Now we have a digital representation of what the designer or customer wants, we have the actual part that we can touch and feel and also a digital twin of that actual part. This digital twin of the actual part can then be sent back to the designers and he can compare what we have manufactured to what his model wants, and even use the actual part model to simulate its impact, digitally, in the final design.

Now we have a digital representation of what the designer or customer wants, we have the actual part that we can touch and feel and also a digital twin of that actual part.

This also means we are able to create digital twins of older components that do not have 3D models today. We can take, say, a car part from a historic car where drawings and even suppliers are no longer available – we can scan that part and then re-create the component, additively, without the need of tooling.... opportunities galore and that is evident in the market place.

In the future I would imagine that not only will there be a digital twin of the component, showing the internal and external requirements, but also a digital twin of the process that made that part; the process parameters, the energy consumption, how long did the build take, how many layers were built, were there any issues.. all of these aspects building a digital picture of the part enabling further analysis and confidence in the components’ final application…

Customers will be able to embed into their 3D models process definitions and encryptions controlling exactly how many ‘prints’ can be generated from their valuable model.

Add to that customers will be able to embed into their 3D models process definitions and encryptions controlling exactly how many ‘prints’ can be generated from their valuable model.

Now some people, some customers don’t want all that.. they just want to know that the final part is good enough. But some customer do, and with the power of the digital world driven by Siemens digital solutions.. this is all possible today!

  • 0

Comments